A Sunday Haiku

You broke my trust from

the start. Now you ask why I

don't give you my heart.

Quote of the Week

There are wounds that never show on the body that are deeper and more hurtful than anything that bleeds.

-Laurell K. Hamilton

Happy Two Years!

Well… it's really a surprise to me that I've now been blogging for two years. I am pleased that what started out of boredom turned out to be pretty much an outlet of many things and feelings. I didn't really think I can keep this up for a month, let alone two years!

2-cake

It's amazing to look back and see how much have changed and how much more left to do. Part of me wants to think that I'm improving in this blogging experience and I hope my entries are becoming better as well. My life has also changed a lot in the past two years. I'm blessed to have visited new places, try new things, learn new stuff, meet new people though I lost some, too. Well, it's all a part of life so I'm just very grateful for every experience.

Also, I think this is one of the best time to thank all my readers for always taking time to read my entries. Thank you to everyone, wherever you may be. I am glad to have come across your blogs and to have met some of you as well. I hope you'd still enjoy the entries this coming year and I'm always looking forward to yours, too.

Thank you and Happy Sunday, homo sapiens! 🙂

Caution!

snake

Here's more: These snakes don't hiss. They talk.

A Six-Word Story

Everyone eventually breaks at some point.

A Six-Word Story

We never kissed… we probably should've.

Quote of the Week

There are far too many silent sufferers. Not because they don't yearn to reach out, but because they've tried and found no one who cares.

-Richelle E. Goodrich

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

MSfMBook #20.

I didn't expect to like this book because self-help stuffs don't usually appeal to me but this one's good.

Man's Search for Meaning is divided into two parts.

The first part speaks of the extreme suffering the author himself, Viktor E. Frankl and his inmates, endured in Nazi concentration camps. He survived no less than four camps and described various stages and situations he and his fellow prisoners have been through and turned his experiences and observations of how they respond in times of adversity into a psychological study. He didn't at all consider the importance of chance or even luck to his survival.

The second part is basically an introduction to logotherapy. Using his observations and experiences while in the camps, he lays out his ideas/theories. The very core of it is a will to meaning, contrary to that of Freud which is will to pleasure or that of Adler which is will to power. He tells us that there are a lot of possible meaning of life and that it can change from day to day, from time to time, from one individual to another — a task we must frequently undertake.

According to logotherapy, we can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: (1) by creating a work or doing a deed; (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering.

Moreover,

Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual. These tasks, and therefore the meaning of life, differ from man to man, and from moment to moment. Thus it is impossible to define the meaning of life in a general way. 

It's a short and engaging book, it may even make you see things or life differently. Life ought to have meaning and I admire Frankl's view of it as well as his view on what joy we can derive through acceptance of our sufferings. I think it's pretty extraordinary that he was able to explore and study what must have been the darkest period of his life, he seemed like a heck of a man to do so without bitterness.

Recommended to everyone. Solid choice for anyone facing adversity or anyone who simply wants to reflect on the content and direction of the life they're leading.

Rating : 4/5 stars

Quotable Quotes :

"Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way."

"Love is the only way to grasp another human being in the innermost core of his personality. No one can become fully aware of the very essence of another human being unless he loves him. By his love he is enabled to see the essential traits and features in the beloved person; and even more, he sees that which is potential in him, which is not yet actualized but yet ought to be actualized. Furthermore, by his love, the loving person enables the beloved person to actualize these potentialities. By making him aware of what he can be and of what he should become, he makes these potentialities come true."

"Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather must recognize that it is he who is asked. In a word, each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible."

"No man should judge unless he asks himself in absolute honesty whether in a similar situation he might not have done the same."

"A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the why for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any how."

A Tuesday Haiku

Amidst the desert

I feel like a wanderer

yearning for water.

A Six-Word Story

There’s nothing left worth fighting for.